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Edgelands By Paul Farley Michael Symmons Roberts,

  • Title: Edgelands
  • Author: Paul Farley Michael Symmons Roberts
  • ISBN: 9780224089029
  • Page: 129
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Edgelands explores a wilderness that is much closer than you think a debatable zone, neither the city nor the countryside, but a place in between so familiar it is never seen for looking Passed through, negotiated, unnamed, ignored, the edgelands have become the great wild places on our doorsteps, places so difficult to acknowledge they barely exist Edgelands forms aEdgelands explores a wilderness that is much closer than you think a debatable zone, neither the city nor the countryside, but a place in between so familiar it is never seen for looking Passed through, negotiated, unnamed, ignored, the edgelands have become the great wild places on our doorsteps, places so difficult to acknowledge they barely exist Edgelands forms a critique of what we value as wild , and allows our allotments, railways, motorways, wasteland and water a presence in the world, and a strange beauty all of their own.Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts both well known poets have lived and worked and known these places all their lives, and in Edgelands their journeying prose fuses, in the anonymous tradition, to allow this in between world to speak up for itself They write about mobile masts and gravel pits, business parks and landfill sites in the same way the Romantic writers forged a way of looking at an overlooked but now familiar landscape of hills and lakes and rivers England, the first country to industrialise, now offers the world s most mature post industrial terrain, and is still in a state of flux Edgelands takes the reader on a journey through its forgotten spaces so that we can marvel at this richly mysterious, cheek by jowl region in our midst.
    Edgelands Edgelands explores a wilderness that is much closer than you think a debatable zone neither the city nor the countryside but a place in between so familiar it is never seen for looking Passed throug

    One thought on “Edgelands”

    1. Most of the non fiction I read has an element of nature writing about it, but this book is rather than that Farley and Roberts aim is to reclaim and celebrate the edgelands that surround our cities, and the book is a fascinating account of the way landscapes are developed either by human intervention or by nature reclaiming what is left behind after human activity Both writers are poets, so the book is inevitably reflective and personal, despite the joint authorial voice which makes it impossib [...]

    2. Loved it A fascinating traipse through those areas which are certainly not rural but are not exactly urban The two writers are both published poets and this is certainly very clear though not in a forced look at us we are poets and cannot speak unless its in poetic imagery and purple prose type way They have beautiful turns of phrase, they quote fellow poets and their imagery often enhances and cetainly challenged my preconceived ideas The areas dealt with range from the ruralish aspect of woodl [...]

    3. Personal explorations and childhood recollections by the authors united into one voice , plus a good trawl of references to writings, art and photography informed by those edgelands which border the city proper and the countryside , seen only as edges if, as usually, simply travelled through, but as territories in their own right when imaginatively visited At the quarter way through point, this is enjoyable and easy to read, succinctly chaptered into subjects e.g Dens , Containers , Paths , and [...]

    4. I dearly wanted to enjoy this book The liminal space between urban and rural formal and unformal, order and chaos that Farley and Roberts speak of is a place I spent far too much time snaking about in during my teenage years I already adore the edgelands , so a book exploring and re evaluating them seemed perfect.What I found, unfortunately, was a series of over romanticised, over generalised, and meandering tangents only rarely insightful, clever or poignant I could count on two hands the amoun [...]

    5. A very disappointing book I bought it expecting to enjoy a series of prose poems evoking the strange attraction of city margins Instead I found a series of pseudo intellectual essays about the different things to be found there There was little sense of the particular just the authors generalised and often irritating whimsy I shall not be keeping this book.

    6. Beautiful and engrossing Psychogeography is a battleground you ve got social commentators using it, and artists, and occultists These authors, being poets, do their bit here to stake a claim for the right of poets to use the psychogeographical kitbag There are some asides, early on, about the miserabilist tendencies of psychogeographers a not so suitable dig at the likes of Iain Sinclair and Will Self The book thus sets out its credentials as inclined to beauty than socio cultural critique And [...]

    7. Though I was at times slightly frustrated by the uncertainty of this never was edgeland convincingly defined for me it seemed to just mean anything town or country that the authors wanted to define as such and though it did wander off into pretentiousness at times, I did enjoy this.The co authors discuss various aspects of the British landscape, focussing on boundaries and hinterlands Allotments, canals, dumps, wastelands, retail parks, and many it s a curiously put together mixture of poetry, [...]

    8. After an intro which nearly put me off altogether its we made it feel far too much like a manifesto , this settles down into a charming celebration of the pleasures of overgrown nowheres in particular, and why mothballed building sites make the best playgrounds Like Iain Sinclair, the authors are both poets, but their prose isn t quite so dense for the sake of it, and nor are they such thoroughly miserable sods.

    9. Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts introduce us to a part of our world that we had long forgotten even existed.This unlikely addition to my bookshelf was recommended to me by someone who has since gone off on travels to Shangri La in a hot air balloon, but when they return, I shall be sure to express my unending gratitude for their counsel Edgelands is a series of journeys into the parts of England s wilderness that we are all accustomed to either ignoring or looking past Neither the town n [...]

    10. For someone who has always been scared of abandoned cars on the side of a roads, this book was always going to at least hold my attention The authors are fascinated by the spaces between the urban and the rural and do well in attempting to break down this particularly prevalent binary by focusing on all the bits that don t fit Given that the authors are poets with university affiliations rather than geographers, this is about imaginative space than physical.This reads like a poetry collection [...]

    11. brilliant really enjoyable read i loved the way they constructed thought patterns through their use of language to explore the edgelands Their sentence construction, short chapters, made it hugely informative and enjoyable.

    12. Bought as soon as it came out on the strength of a Spectator review Was entranced by the language than I anticipated and I really need to read it again.

    13. Beautifully written book by two poets It describes the landscapes at the periphery of towns where the urban meets the rural Well worth reading.

    14. This is a book about those scrappy, overgrown and generally unloved piece sof land that no one seems to really notice or care about They may have once had a hous eo or a factory standing on them which has long since vanished Or the piece of wasteland was just never owned by anyone They re often on the edge of towns, villages, industrial estates or retail parks But they can provide powerful habitats for wildlife as I have discovered for myself and the authors of this book describes them as the la [...]

    15. Never let poets write a travelogue Despite the Dewey Decimal system classing this tome as economics, this is a travel book, but instead of quirky tales about eccentric characters they meet, late trains or beautiful vistas, Farley and Roberts write about the edges of cities the sewage plants, landfill sites, canals, retail parks, industrial parks, warehouses, wasteland, bridges, cooling towers, pylons, whilst referencing The Fall, Black Box Recorder, their own childhoods and naming chapters like [...]

    16. I haven t read anything this academic since my university days but I was pleased to found I enjoyed it overall The book treads a fine line between a poetic expose and scholarly place based commentary At times this wanders well away from the beaten track into general societal and historical discussion but overall this probably adds to its charm as a set of off beat observations that don t quite fit into a specific genre a bit like the edgelands themselves I suppose and probably the whole point of [...]

    17. When I was younger I fancied myself as something of a singer songerwiter Sat in a pre fab in Camberwell I composed many angst ridden songs in A minor One was called Waiting for the Ragman The final chorus went You head out for the blacknessAround the edge of townYou hit the local graveyardTo see what s going downIn the country of the bilndThe cyclops wears the crown.A year after I wrote this Bruce Springsteen released Darkness On the Edge of Town I was convinced that everyone would imagined I d [...]

    18. From BBC radio 4 Book of the Week Poets Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts explore a wilderness that is much closer than you think those debatable zones that are neither town nor countryside These two lyric poets celebrate the strange beauty of these places that we all journey through, but generally fail to acknowledge.Recorded entirely on location in the English edgelands, this Book of the Week journeys through the post industrial landscapes of ruined warehouses, landfill sites, retail par [...]

    19. blurbs Poets Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts explore a wilderness that is much closer than you think those debatable zones that are neither town nor countryside These two lyric poets celebrate the strange beauty of these places that we all journey through, but generally fail to acknowledge.Recorded entirely on location in the English edgelands, this Book of the Week journeys through the post industrial landscapes of ruined warehouses, landfill sites, retail parks, sewage works and power [...]

    20. Thoroughly enjoyed this book I know Farley is a John Clare Man the great rural poet gets a fair few mentions in this book the spirit of Clare is ever present There were times that I did not follow the links in the book as the connections between topics was rather loose but this did not deter from the poetic descriptions and the humorous observations I went for a cycle ride along an old railway line last Sunday I crossed the River Trent over a viaduct had wonderful views of the power stations alo [...]

    21. A brilliant exploration of those spaces which are neither countryside nor town city, which are largely ignored or missed by most of us, as we pass them by on our way to from places Poets Paul Farley Michael Symmons Roberts take the reader on a journey through these forgotten wastelands, some empty, others over developed, which exist on the outskirts of the places we live.Within chapters headed Dens Sewage Canals Woodlands Pallets Retail Weather , we are transported into an alien yet familiar lan [...]

    22. In part, I am to blame for not enjoying this a cursory glance at it led me to believe it was about urban fauna and flora, so my expectations were way off the mark Nonetheless, I failed to be won over by this whimsical sprawl There are next to no facts in this book, but nor are there any mind blowing ideas, just half thought out, empty headed meanderings and conjecture, which run out of steam very quickly It is telling that no section lasts than three pages before shifting focus, the two writers [...]

    23. Very interesting wander through those parts of the country that are so often overlooked, ignored or vaguely registered as we fly past them But they often tell us far about our society and our attitude to countryside and wildlife than the built up or preserved parts The scruffy, ignored bits are often those that wildlife of all kinds like the best yet the bits that people often think of as spoiling the view This is a fascinating exploration of these areas cultural, historical, poetical as well [...]

    24. The book is based on a fascinating idea what happens at the edges of cities Who is there What behaviours take place A series of edges lofts, gardens, ruins, canals become the basis of chapters It was an easy read While there were too many adjectives for my liking and it is descriptive, it provided to use a metaphor from the book a pathway that is not sanctioned, but is both available and evocative.Please note GoodReads has left an author off this listing The book was written by Paul Farley and M [...]

    25. I really enjoyed this opens your eyes Memories of childhood ramblings over the remains of the mining landscape of a south wales valley The remains of the pit baths, a pool on the old tennis courts that I knew would hold frog spawn and all manner of mysterious bits of metal to pick up Now mostly wiped away as the valuable coal dust in the spoil heaps was washed out and paid for landscaping Read in Thanet with plenty of edge on display

    26. I know everyone thinks this book is so great and it s on a subject that interests me but I found it boring It just rambled on and on and on The writing style irritated me It reminded me of a certain type of academic who you wonder how they get away with their consistent vagueness I think the contents could have made an interesting essay but didn t warrant a whole book I lost patience halfway through and stopped reading so maybe it got better but I m guessing it was just of the same.

    27. A fascinating book, sort of a Poetics of Space for the overlooked areas between the city and the suburbs, marginal land formerly occupied by industry or currently occupied by business parks, weather stations, or big box stores Farley and Roberts are remarkable writers with a wry sense of humor foremost, though, they are excellent tour guides, offering a glimpse into a portion of the landscape most of us overlook.

    28. Not as enjoyable as I hoped, I think I was expecting something in the Seybold vein Some lovely writing, thiough, and the book is a fantastic gateway to various artists and poets who have celebrated the edgelands in all their forms through the ages Some of the conceits are a stretch and feel laboured, but I certainly found enough here to illuminate even if I was never dazzled.

    29. I don t mean this in a negative way, but this is a fantastic book for inducing sleep There s a gentle floating quality to it that immediately makes you feel like you are already half dreaming Each chapter transports you poetically from familiar places nearby, out toward the slightly stranger places beyond

    30. Funny book this written by two poets, it feels like a loose collection of thoughts and prose rather than a fully formed book It s almost as if I d stumbled across their notebook Some really interesting thoughts and views, though, on our less celebrated areas of nature, and certain parts reminded me of playing in these edgelands during the summer as a kid Worth a read.

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