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The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay By Jess Bravin, The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay Jess The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay by Jess Bravin Author The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay Kindle May , Jess Bravin s The Terror Courts is the definitive account of the legal aftermath of and the still unsettled legacy of the decisions made in those frenzied days Jeffrey Toobin, author of The Oath The Obama White House vs the Supreme Court The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay by Jess The Terror Courts is a comprehensive accounting of the creation of the commissions in the months after the Sept attacks It is a book that pulls no punches It is a The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay by Jess Jan , I read Jess Bravin s The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay It tells the story of how The Bush administration envisioned military courts being a way of dispensing loose justice, but then also how highly ethical military lawyers worked to reject evidence based on torture. The Terror Courts Truthdig The Terror Courts is a comprehensive accounting of the creation of the commissions in the months after the attacks It is a book that pulls no punches. The Terror Courts Home Facebook A military judge has set a January trial date for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other Guantanamo detainees accused of orchestrating the Sept.

  • Title: The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay
  • Author: Jess Bravin
  • ISBN: 9780300189209
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Soon after the September 11 attacks in 2001, the United States captured hundreds of suspected al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world By the following January the first of these prisoners arrived at the U.S military s prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they were subject to President George W Bush s executive order authorizing their trial by militSoon after the September 11 attacks in 2001, the United States captured hundreds of suspected al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world By the following January the first of these prisoners arrived at the U.S military s prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they were subject to President George W Bush s executive order authorizing their trial by military commissions Jess Bravin, the Wall Street Journal s Supreme Court correspondent, was there within days of the prison s opening, and has continued ever since to cover the U.S effort to create a parallel justice system for enemy aliens A maze of legal, political, and moral issues has stood in the way of justice issues often raised by military prosecutors who found themselves torn between duty to the chain of command and their commitment to fundamental American values.While much has been written about Guantanamo and brutal detention practices following 9 11, Bravin is the first to go inside the Pentagon s prosecution team to expose the real world legal consequences of those policies Bravin describes cases undermined by inadmissible evidence obtained through torture, clashes between military lawyers and administration appointees, and political interference in criminal prosecutions that would be shocking within the traditional civilian and military justice systems With the Obama administration planning to try the alleged 9 11 conspirators at Guantanamo and vindicate the legal experiment the Bush administration could barely get off the ground The Terror Courts could not be timely.
    The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay Soon after the September attacks in the United States captured hundreds of suspected al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world By the following January the first of these prison

    One thought on “The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay”

    1. This is a very lucid examination of what the Bush administration did after 9 11 to bypass justice, to allow torture, and to sequester prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.Shortly after 9 11 there was a seizure for power by the presidential executive to bypass all regular procedures for law enforcement All power and decision making, particularly for legal purposes the power of arrest, detainment, the means of waging war , was to be done at the presidential level People could be arrested and charges made u [...]

    2. From weeksnotice 2016 I read Jess Bravin s The Terror Courts Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay 2013 It tells the story of how The Bush administration envisioned military courts being a way of dispensing loose justice, but then also how highly ethical military lawyers worked to reject evidence based on torture It s a great read, though disappointing how its common sense lessons don t penetrate into the public consciousness.Bravin is a Wall Street Journal reporter His narrative keeps coming back to [...]

    3. Great inside perspective on the legal arbitrariness behind the construction of military commissions in addition to a follow up on the lack of action by the Obama administration in closing these commissions and Guantanamo Bay entirely The idealization of particular elements of the American military in ethical terms, in addition to the uncritical promotion of the American judiciary system the federal court system in particular despite highlighting the political ideological bias that plagues these [...]

    4. It took me a long time to get into this, and not merely because any account of how the military commissions to try terror suspects came to be and how they worked was likely to produce overwhelming despair There was also the author s relentless lionization of him main source who is apparently valiant, and all American, and handsome, and was somewhat like reading a Mitchell Zuckerman book In consequence, this was another book I put down for months in the middle After the first few chapters I went [...]

    5. Pretty good book The author has a tendency to ramble a little He gives a ton of background on some of the players, including some long passages on their home towns When the book focuses on the inner workings of the terror courts it s very interesting I would say my only other critique is that a very small amount of information is first person interviews most just comes from interviews from other journalists But the author does put everything together in a way that tracks the courts creation thro [...]

    6. Having gone down and personally witnessed the pre trial proceedings for detainees, this book gives a fantastic, unbiased, well researched background to what I saw This is a must read for anyone interested in U.S efforts to figure out how to deal with terrorists in a battlefield that is not clear cut.

    7. A skillfully written, beautifully lucid book that takes us behind the scenes of the Bush administration s decision to bypass the American judicial system and prosecute terror suspects by military commission Recommended reading for critics and supporters of the administration s approach to the war on terror.

    8. An excellent reporting job on the creation and dis functioning of the military commission courts set up after 9 11 Bravin manages to maintain a fairly even keel I was most impressed by the individuals who dutifully did their jobs conscientiously, in particular the hero of the story, Stuart Couch Couch proved that doing the right thing is not an ideological position.

    9. A very good read It was well researched and clearly written Not a book you can pick up and put down as you read it unless you have a better memory for names than I do but still an interesting book.

    10. not a good narrative Too many characters each with their own background Not a fan and knew it from the start.

    11. An excellent history of the legal history that led to the wrongs of American efforts in bringing Terrorist to justice You cannot justify unlawfulness.

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