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The Horse in the City: Living Machines in the Nineteenth Century By Clay McShane Joel A. Tarr,

  • Title: The Horse in the City: Living Machines in the Nineteenth Century
  • Author: Clay McShane Joel A. Tarr
  • ISBN: 9780801886003
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The nineteenth century was the golden age of the horse In urban America, the indispensable horse provided the power for not only vehicles that moved freight, transported passengers, and fought fires but also equipment in breweries, mills, foundries, and machine shops.Clay McShane and Joel A Tarr, prominent scholars of American urban life, here explore the critical role tThe nineteenth century was the golden age of the horse In urban America, the indispensable horse provided the power for not only vehicles that moved freight, transported passengers, and fought fires but also equipment in breweries, mills, foundries, and machine shops.Clay McShane and Joel A Tarr, prominent scholars of American urban life, here explore the critical role that the horse played in the growing nineteenth century metropolis Using such diverse sources as veterinary manuals, stable periodicals, teamster magazines, city newspapers, and agricultural yearbooks, they examine how the horses were housed and fed and how workers bred, trained, marketed, and employed their four legged assets Not omitting the problems of waste removal and corpse disposal, they touch on the municipal challenges of maintaining a safe and productive living environment for both horses and people and the rise of organizations like the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.In addition to providing an insightful account of life and work in nineteenth century urban America, The Horse in the City brings us to a richer understanding of how the animal fared in this unnatural and presumably uncomfortable setting.
    The Horse in the City Living Machines in the Nineteenth Century The nineteenth century was the golden age of the horse In urban America the indispensable horse provided the power for not only vehicles that moved freight transported passengers and fought fires b

    One thought on “The Horse in the City: Living Machines in the Nineteenth Century”

    1. Having read this immediately after Greene s Horses at Work, I can t help but compare the two In that balance, this book is the drier, but mostly because it s stuffed full of fascinating statistics and fine grained detail about economic changes location and construction of stables, the expansion of the suburbs, and the development of grain markets and logistics The former has narrative this one has background.

    2. This book provides excellent statistical information, much of it difficult to find That said, I have a major problem with this book in that the authors are obviously not experienced horsemen Although I m grateful for the factual information, I tend to be suspicious when authors are working outside their area of expertise For example, page 85 contains this line The noted Paul ecologist Paul Shepard has claimed that horses are inherently sensual object because of their sleek coats and body curves [...]

    3. We typically think of the nineteenth century as the era when machine power finally replaced animal power The invention of the steam engine and its elaboration supposedly ended the dominance of horses, mules, and oxen in transport and production.Clay McShane and Joel Tarr show that the opposite actually happened The number of people per horse in the major industrial cities went from about 40 down to about 25, and this when those cities populations expanded several times over By almost any measure [...]

    4. Just 100 odd years ago horses were a mainstay in America s cities This book looks at the various roles the horse played in city life pulling streetcars and delivery carts, as well as rich folk s fancy coaches Looks at all aspects of the city horse where and how they were bred, fed, stabled, over worked, and finally what to do with a dead horse abandoned in the street Very interesting but the narrative is a bit too scholarly at times.Reread this book in the Fall of 2016just to reacquaint myself w [...]

    5. Even into the 1920s, cities were built around the use of horses piles of horse shit and its disposal, corners wagons could turn, hills horse drawn wagons could manage, not to mention dead horses, the fire hazards of stables full of hay, stolen horse recovery, the ambiguous status of Teamsters within 19th century labor unions, the social effect of omnibuses, rendering plants and the ASPCA An entire infrastructure of blacksmiths, leather workers, vets, feed dealers and horse traders existed to sup [...]

    6. This is the best nonfiction book I ve read in a long time I m not a horse person but every part of this book is fascinating.

    7. This book is very informative I am a history lover and a horse nut so a great read for me I would have liked to see the author use cities in the work.

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